Gemma Taylor

Gemma is an Assistant Professor in Clinical Psychology at the University of Bath, and Research Director of the Addiction and Mental Health Group (AIM). Gemma’s research uses epidemiological methods to investigate intervention targets, and then interpret findings using behavioural and psychological theory for application to mental health and addiction treatment settings.

To date Gemma’s work has had a large impact on smoking cessation treatment guidelines by countering the myth that smoking is good for mental health, and has been used internationally to frame smoking cessation treatment guidelines and policies.

Gemma holds a CRUK population researcher fellowship to design and test an integrated smoking cessation intervention for people with depression/anxiety in NHS mental health services in a pilot and feasibility study. You can see animations about the intervention on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQn4MbWbiSU&t=2s and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HiYBGOQ-PIo&t=1s.

You can follow Gemma on Twitter @GemmaMJTaylor, @Bath_AIM


Impact of intervention delivery and behaviour change techniques on the effectiveness of behavioural and mood management interventions for smoking cessation in people with depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis


Aim: To provide information to develop tailored smoking cessation interventions for people w/depression we added to an earlier Cochrane review by: 1) using the TIDER checklist to determine if variations in mood management delivery impact on intervention effectiveness, 2) used the BCT for smoking cessation to examine which behaviour change functions were most effective for smoking cessation, 3) examined the impact of intervention on depression symptoms.
Methods: Systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs for smoking cessation, in people with depression.
Outcomes: Smoking cessation at >6-months, change in depression scores from baseline to >6-months. Analysis step 1)a random effects univariate meta-regression, effect modifiers (TIDER items) were regressed on the study’s effect estimate, 2) multilevel mixed-effects meta-regression, each study was treated as one level, and within-arm effect modifiers were the second level, then within-arm behaviour change functions were regressed on each arms’ quit rate, 3) inverse variance random effects meta-analysis to pool the standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95%CIs in depression scores, from baseline to follow-up, between trial arms.
Results: Included 22 RCTs. There was weak evidence that smoking cessation interventions delivered by mental health professionals were associated with worse cessation rates, pooled risk difference -0.7 (95%CI: -1.4 to 0.0). Some BCTs had an effect when grouped according to their function. Interventions produced a small improvement in depression scores, pooled SMD -0.1 (95%CI: -0.3 to 0.1).
Conclusion: The TIDER checklist does not explain much variation in the impact of mood management interventions on smoking cessation. BCTs had an effect when categorised according to their function. Smoking cessation support does not worsen depression symptoms.

Poster link: Impact of intervention delivery and behaviour change techniques on the effectiveness of behavioural and mood management interventions for smoking cessation in people with depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis