Miss Jo-Anne Puddephatt

Jo-Anne is a Research Assistant at the University of Liverpool working on projects related to addiction, behaviour change interventions and inhibitory processes. Jo-Anne also holds a voluntary post at Manchester Metropolitan University on a project which aims to develop a mobile application for those with mental health issues. Prior to these roles, Jo-Anne worked in mental health and completed her Masters and Bachelors degree at Liverpool John Moores University in Health Psychology and Applied Psychology, respectively. Jo-Anne’s research interests include addiction, mental health, and behaviour change.


The comorbidity of mental health problems and alcohol use in England: Findings from a representative population survey


Aims
To examine the prevalence of alcohol use and mental health problem (MHP) comorbidity using an English national dataset of England.

Methods
We analysed cross-sectional data from the 2014 wave of the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey to assess the prevalence of alcohol use and MHP comorbidity (N = 7,546). Alcohol use was measured using the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test, categorised as non-drinkers, low risk, hazardous and harmful/probable dependence (HPD). MHP were measured via validated screening tools. Prevalence estimates were calculated for alcohol use, comparing those with and without MHP, using cross-tabulation and percentages were weighted for design and response rates.

Results
Of those with severe symptoms of common mental disorder, 31.49% reported not drinking compared to 21.03% of those without symptoms. A similar pattern was found for HPD: 8.08% of those with severe symptoms of common mental disorder reported HPD compared to 1.85% of those without symptoms. Differences in alcohol use were most notable for those with more severe mental health problems. 50.86% of those with psychotic disorder in the past year reported not drinking compared to 21.39% of those without. We found no evidence of an association between hazardous alcohol use and MHP.

Conclusions
This is the first study to examine the prevalence of alcohol use comorbidity across MHPs using an English national dataset. Our findings suggest that those with a MHP are more likely to be either non-drinkers or report HPD compared to hazardous use.

Poster link: The comorbidity of mental health problems and alcohol use in England: Findings from a representative population survey