Can exercise reduce anxiety, depression and worrying and decrease the use of alcohol?

First published: 10/05/2019 | Last updated: May 20th, 2019

Title: Can exercise reduce anxiety, depression and worrying and decrease the use of alcohol?

R. Bilberg, S. Sari, K.K. Roessler

Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate whether there is an association between anxiety, depression and worrying, and the amount and frequency of alcohol intake in patients with AUD, who received treatment and subsequently participated in an exercise intervention.

Design: The study (Healthy Lifestyle study) was a randomized clinical trial with three arms: 1) participants were exercise in groups with an instructor; 2) participants exercise alone; and 3) a control group. All participants receive treatment as usual (TAU) in the clinical alcohol treatment center alongside participating in the Health Lifestyle study.

Setting: The Healthy Lifestyle was performed in the outpatient alcohol treatment center in Odense, Denmark.

Participants: This study includes 113 participants of the 175 participants in the Healthy Lifestyle study, who had completed CMD-SQ regarding anxiety, depression and worries.

Intervention (where appropriate): Se design

Measurements: Timeline follow back (TLFB), Common Mental Disorders – Screening Questionnaire (CMD-SQ) and the Addiction Severity Index (ASI).

Findings and conclusions (the findings should be clearly listed)

*There are no association between exercise and anxiety, depression and worries in this study.

*Participants are decreasing their symptoms of anxiety, and depression from baseline up to twelve months after baseline.

*There is a clear linear association between the use of alcohol at baseline and the symptoms of anxiety, and depression at baseline, six and twelve months after baseline.

*Worries symptoms are different from anxiety and depression, because they are not significantly changing from baseline to six and twelve months after baseline.

Co-Authors

Post doc Sengul Sari – Unit of Clinical Alcohol Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense Professor Kirsten Kaya Roessler, Institut of Psychology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense


Conflicts of interest:

No conflicts of interest.

Ms Randi Bilberg